Circulars on the History and Habits of the Potato Bug and Cottonworm with Full Directions on the Use of Paris Green for Their Destruction Sent Free on Application to Your Merchant or to F.W. Devoe & Co., New York, Single Sheet [Cotton Worm].

Circulars on the History and Habits of the Potato Bug and Cottonworm with Full Directions on the Use of Paris Green for Their Destruction Sent Free on Application to Your Merchant or to F.W. Devoe & Co., New York, Single Sheet [Cotton Worm]

New York: Snyder & Black. Single Sheet. Near Fine. Item #2326312

No chips or tears. General light wear.

13 x 19 1/2 inches. Circulars on the History and Habits of the Potato Bug and Cottonworm with Full Directions on the Use of Paris Green for Their Destruction Sent Free on Application to Your Merchant or to F.W. Devoe & Co., New York. Paris green (copper(II) acetate triarsenite or copper(II) acetoarsenite) is an inorganic compound. As a green pigment it is also known as Schweinfurt green, emerald green or Vienna green. It is a highly toxic emerald-green crystalline powder that has been used as a rodenticide and insecticide, and also as a pigment, despite its toxicity. It is also used as a blue colorant for fireworks. The color of Paris green is said to range from a pale blue green when very finely ground, to a deeper green when coarsely ground. It was invented as 'emerald green' in 1814 by two chemists, Russ and Sattler, at the Wilhelm Dye and White Lead Company of Schweinfurt, Bavaria. They were attempting to produce an improved pigment over Scheele's green, particularly so that it was longer-lasting and less susceptible to darkening around sulfides. When they published the recipe in 1822, its toxicity became obvious. Despite this, like Scheele's green, it continued to be involved in poisoning accidents. In 1867, farmers in Illinois and Indiana found that Paris green was effective against the Colorado potato beetle, an aggressive agricultural pest. Despite concerns regarding the safety of using arsenic compounds on food crops, Paris green became the preferred method for controlling the beetle. By the 1880s, Paris green had become the first widespread use of a chemical insecticide in the world. It was also used widely in the Americas to control the tobacco budworm, Heliothis virescens. Paris green was heavily sprayed by airplane in Italy, Sardinia, and Corsica during 1944 and in Italy in 1945 to control malaria. It was once used to kill rats in Parisian sewers, which is how it acquired its common name.

Price: $250.00

See all items in Animals, Ephemera, Home & Garden, Science